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Gardening Daily Tips June 19
Sunday June 19, 2011


Smoke Bush, Smoke Tree (Cotinus coggygria)

Today’s Featured Plant
Smoke Bush, Smoke Tree (Cotinus coggygria)

Read the full profile of this plant at ArcaMax.com.

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Q&A: Transplanting Dogwoods

Question: Could I get some tips on transplanting some native dogwoods to one of my garden beds? I have planted a sapling before but had very little success.

Answer: Late spring and summer is a really risky time to try to transplant your dogwood. The loss of roots on such a large plant is very stressful. Combine this with the heat of summer and your chances of success are very low. November would be a better time, as it would allow the tree some time to settle in and begin root growth before the onset of warm weather. When you dig the tree, get as much of the roots as possible. The more the better. Try to get a small seedling. The shock of transplanting due to loss of roots seems to be less devastating to smaller trees. Experts debate the advantage of cutting back the top, but I think that on a dogwood I would not cut the top back as they really don’t like being pruned. Dig the new hole only as deep as the plant’s root system, wider is okay. I wouldn’t amend the soil with anything. Your native soil is fine. Don’t put fertilizer in the planting hole. The plant will be trying to establish a new root system, and additional nutrients are not needed until new roots are established. Water the plant in well after planting and keep moist but not soggy this first season.

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Q&A: Removing Ivy from Trees

Question: Is it harmful to a tree to have English ivy climbiing it? Many of our neighbors have ivy growing up their trees, and it looks nice, but my mom thinks the ivy will kill our tree. Will it?

Answer: Ivy can cause all kinds of problems when it is allowed to climb up tree trunks. It can hold too much moisture against the bark, leading to rot. It can cause splitting of the outer bark of the tree due to the shear force of the growing vines. If it’s allow to climb up very far, it will become heavy enough to cause stress to the tree and it can act as a sail, catching wind and pulling a tree over. Add this to the potential of strangulation and girdling, and the facts indicate it is wise to remove ivy from the tree. At a minimum, cut enough ivy away to expose the flare of the trunk of the tree where it meets the ground. It would be even better to remove the ivy within several feet of the trunk. After removing the roots and cutting the vines at ground level, pull what you can from the tree. This might mean that you’ll have to cut the intertwining vines and pull them off in pieces. Anything you can’t reach to remove (including the disc-like pads), will eventually weather away. Don’t worry too much about removing the pads — they won’t produce new plants. And, unless a piece of an ivy vine has gotten a foothold in a crevice or other moisture holding spot on the tree, the vine should die off after being cut at ground level.

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Q&A: Bamboo Screen

Question: I live on the edge of a ridge. I’m 60 feet above the street with a pine-filled strip from my yard to the street right-of-way on a 45% grade. I need a good tall sound and sight barrier along the road. What about a clumping or spreading bamboo?

Answer: Bamboo can make a great screen provided you select a hardy, adapted variety. I would strongly recommend a clumping form that will be less invasive. If you want to try a spreading type, you can install a deep, strong, vertical barrier into the soil to prevent bamboo from spreading, but that might be quite a chore on your steep slope! You can check out the American Bamboo Society web site for info on types and characteristics of bamboo species and varieties: http://www.bamboo.org/abs/ However, I think a better alternative is to plant a row of evergreen shrubs and trees, as they will not threaten an invasion and will give superior screening during the winter.

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Tip: Fertilize Leeks

Give your leeks a side-dressing with a complete organic granular fertilizer to keep these heavy feeders growing well. Sprinkle the fertilizer along the row a couple of inches out from the plants, then scratch it lightly into the soil. Use about a cup for every 10 feet of row.

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Tip: Shear Early-Blooming Perennials

Some early-blooming perennials, such as nepeta, will produce a second bloom in late summer if you cut them back after their spring bloom. Fertilize and keep weeds at bay, too.

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Submit Your Favorite Photos

Send your favorite pictures to the ArcaMax Photo Galleries.

It’s a great way to share your best photos with friends and family, and other readers can vote to make your photo the best of the month!

Gardening Photos | Travel Photos | Pet Photos | Baby Photos

— From the ArcaMax editors

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Today’s Reader Submitted Photos

Click an image above to see full size and read caption.
To see more of our subscriber photos visit our full Photo Gallery.Enter your Gardening Daily Tips pictures so you can show them off to other readers right here in this ezine and on the ArcaMax.com Web site. Click here to submit your photo.Sincerely,
ArcaMax Editors
Gardening Daily Tips June 18
Saturday June 18, 2011


Catmint, Siberian Catnip (Nepeta sibirica)

Today’s Featured Plant
Catmint, Siberian Catnip (Nepeta sibirica)

Read the full profile of this plant at ArcaMax.com.

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Q&A: Pruning Rhododendrons

Question: When should I prune my rhododendron, and how far?

Answer: Rhododendrons tend to become bare in the center as they mature unless they’re faithfully pruned every 2-3 years. Depending upon how old your rhodie is, you can lightly prune the tips of the branches, or you can climb in and prune your way out. Rhodies bloom on the ends of two-year old shoots. It takes a full year for blossom buds to develop after a shoot has developed from a main branch or limb. Keep this in mind as you’re pruning. If a branch is bare from the trunk to the tip, you can cut it back and it will develop leaves and shoots from leaf scars below the cut. It’s not a good idea to prune more than one-third of the live plant material in any one year, so you may have to divide your shrub renovation into a two or three year project. Wait until your rhodie finishes blooming this spring before you prune. Then, with your eyes, carefully follow each branch from tip to trunk. Decide where on that branch you’d like new shoots to develop and cut just above a leaf scar. New stems should develop this summer and flower buds should develop the following year. You can expect one or two new shoots to sprout on each branch you cut back.

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Q&A: Which Mulch Should I Use?

Question: What is the best kind of mulch to use in flower gardens and around trees?

Answer: Many materials make satisfactory mulch. Shredded hardwood bark and pine straw are two that work well and are attractive. Organic mulches like these help feed the soil as they break down over time and are usually preferable to an inorganic material such as gravel. Sometimes the best choice is what is available locally at a reasonable price. Black plastic is not recommended as it can suffocate plant roots.

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Q&A: Controlling Weeds in New Border Garden

Question: I recently dug a border garden which contained a lot of crabgrass and other weeds. I would like to begin planting some perennials/small trees and ground cover. What kind of weed killer can I use to prevent the weeds from coming back, and should it be applied prior to or after planting the new flowers?

Answer: There are some pre-emergent herbicides on the market that can be incorporated into the top 3″ of soil after planting your perennials. Or, you can line the bed with one of the poly-spun fabric weed barriers, cutting holes in the fabric to plant your perennials, shrubs and trees. You can cover the weed barrier with decorative rock or bark, or plant groundcover to disguise its presence.

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Tip: Harvest Cabbages

Get ready to begin harvesting your early cabbages. Although you can let them get larger, they are most tender when their heads are soft-ball sized. Try this trick to extend your harvest. After you cut the head from the stalk, cut a quarter-inch cross into the top of the stump. The plant will then produce up to four smaller heads that you can harvest when they are about 3 inches in diameter.

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Tip: Maintain Annual Flowers

Continue to deadhead annual flowers by pinching off fading blossoms, including the developing seed heads within them, to encourage more blooms. Apply fertilizer regularly throughout the season, especially to plants growing in containers.

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Submit Your Favorite Photos

Send your favorite pictures to the ArcaMax Photo Galleries.

It’s a great way to share your best photos with friends and family, and other readers can vote to make your photo the best of the month!

Gardening Photos | Travel Photos | Pet Photos | Baby Photos

Cassava tubers weighing 38kg

Posted on July 7, 2011
Củ khoai mì nặng 38kg
TTO – Một củ khoai mì dài 1,2m, nặng 38kg, đường kính chỗ to nhất 90cm đã được đào lên từ rẫy nhà ông Nguyễn Văn Nhịn ở ấp 9A, xã Mỹ Thành Nam, Cai Lậy, Tiền Giang.
Củ khoai mì to lớn
Củ khoai mì to nhất được xác định ở xã Giang Ly, Khánh Vĩnh, Khánh Hòa cách đây hơn một năm chỉ nặng 34kg, đường kính to nhất chỉ 70cm nhưng có chiều dài 2,2 m.
Đặc biệt là củ khoai của nhà ông Nhịn có hình dáng trông như một con cá, trông rất lạ.
Củ khoai này đã được ông Nhịn tặng lại cho ông thông gia ở ấp I, Tân Bình, Cai Lậy. Hiện tại, có rất nhiều bà con đến “chiêm ngưỡng” củ khoai này.
MỸ PHƯƠNG
From: NV Chuong
Fax: (061).3868632www.FoodCrops.Wordpress.com
See more topics …NGOC PHUONG NAM, FOODCROPS.vn


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